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The improbable era the South since World War II by Charles Pierce Roland

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Published by University Press of Kentucky in Lexington .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • Southern States

Subjects:

  • Southern States -- Politics and government -- 1951-,
  • Southern States -- Economic conditions -- 1945-,
  • Southern States -- Social life and customs.

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementCharles P. Roland.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsF216.2 .R64 1976
The Physical Object
Pagination228 p. ;
Number of Pages228
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL4901408M
ISBN 100813101395
LC Control Number76046033
OCLC/WorldCa2985450

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