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Riding for Caesar The Roman Emperors Horse Guard by Michael P. Speidel

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Published by Harvard University Press .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • European history: BCE to c 500 CE,
  • Social history,
  • Military Science,
  • Cavalry,
  • Military History - Ancient,
  • Technology,
  • History - General History,
  • Literature: Classics,
  • Ancient Rome,
  • Ancient - Rome,
  • Military - General,
  • History / Ancient / Rome

Book details:

The Physical Object
FormatPaperback
Number of Pages223
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL7693426M
ISBN 100674768981
ISBN 109780674768987
OCLC/WorldCa228292707

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Riding for Caesar: The Roman Emperor's Horseguard - Kindle edition by Speidel, Michael P.. Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets. Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading /5(6). Caesar praised them in his Commentaries. Trajan had them carved on his Column. Hadrian wrote poems about them. Well might these rulers have immortalized the horse guard, whose fortunes so closely kept pace with their own. Riding for Caesar follows these horsemen from their rally to rescue Caesar at Noviodunum in 52 B.C. to their last stand alongside Maxentius at the Milvian . Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Riding for Caesar: The Roman Emperor's Horse Guard by Michael P. Speidel (, Hardcover) at the best online prices at eBay! Free shipping for many products! Read "Riding for Caesar The Roman Emperor's Horseguard" by Micheal P. Speidel available from Rakuten Kobo. First Published in Routledge is an Brand: Taylor And Francis.

Written by one of the world's leading authorities on the Roman army, this history reveals the remarkable part the horse guard played in the fate of the Roman empire. Riding for Caesar follows the horsemen in political maneuvers and on the battlefield, from Caesar to Constantine. It offers a colorful picture of these horsemen in all their changing guises and duties -- as the . 1st Edition Published on May 8, by Routledge Professor Speidel's book represents the first history of the Roman horse guard ever written and provides a rea Riding for Caesar: The Roman Emperor's Horseguard - 1st Edition - Mich. Caesar praised them in his Commentaries. Trajan had them carved on his Column. Hadrian wrote poems about them. Well might these rulers have immortalized the horse guard, whose fortunes so closely kept pace with their own. Riding for Caesar follows these horsemen from their rally Price: $ Riding for Caesar follows these horsemen from their rally to rescue Caesar at Noviodunum in 52 B.C. to their last stand alongside Maxentius at the Milvian Bridge. Written by one of the world\'s leading authorities on the Roman army, this history reveals the remarkable part the horse guard played in the fate of the Roman empire.

The book closes with Crassus and Pompey riding along the Via Appia towards Rome, passing six thousand crucified slaves. The two have been assuming power and, having exiled Caesar to Hispania, enter the city, with Pompey believing Caesar will be . In The Death of Caesar, author Barry Strauss touches on the lives of some of the women surrounding the conspirators, including Brutus's wife Porcia Catonis, the daughter of Brutus's uncle Cato the Younger, and perhaps, the only woman who knew about the conspiracy to assassinate Caesar. Much of Porcia's life is undocumented. It's believed she was born some . Riding for Caesar: the Roman Emperors' horse guards. [Michael Speidel] Professor Speidel's book represents the first history of the Roman horse guard ever written and provides a readable account of the intricate part these men played in the fate of the Roman From Caesar to Nero 2. Riding high: the second century 3. The roughshod third.   THE DEATH OF CAESAR tells a familiar tale, but it does an excellent job of putting the characters of the assassination into their political context. Strauss explains that Caesar's assassination occurred for a variety of reasons, depending on the individual conspirators, and he does a good job of explaining the conflicts and fault lines of Roman /5.